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Strokes 12% More Deadly on Weekends!


Here is an astonishing fact! Individuals who suffer a stroke on a weekend are nearly 12% more likely to die than those individuals who suffer a stroke on a weekday. This fact was found in a second major study conducted by Canadian researchers. However, the study failed to find any clear reason for the increased rate of deaths following strokes on weekends. The research was reported in the medical journal, Neurology. Read on to know more about the astonishing finding.

Several other studies have found an increased risk of death linked with hospitalization for different health complications on the weekend like pulmonary embolism and cancer. Many health experts believe that the high mortality rates occur due to reduced staffing and less specialists available on weekends. Hence, there is less likelihood of getting quick specialized tests for the patients.

About the Study
The study was based on reports of 26, 676 stroke patients who were admitted to 606 Canadian hospitals between April 2003 – March 2004. This study was done in the year 2007. The researchers found that nearly a quarter of the stroke patients were hospitalized on weekends. Also, it was revealed that patients hospitalized on weekends had a 14% higher mortality rate within the following seven days.

However, the study result does not imply that patients who suffer a stroke on the weekend should not go to hospitals. This will endanger the patients’ lives. On the contrary, the study findings indicate that the medical complications which require hospitalization on weekends may increase the risk of mortality.

A New Study – The Breakthrough
Dr. Moira K. Kapral and her colleagues from the University of Toronto studied nearly 20, 657 patients admitted to 11 stroke centers located in Ontario between July 1, 2003 – March 30, 2008. The study revealed that the rate of deaths was 7% for people hospitalized during weekdays when compared with 8.1% for people hospitalized during weekends.

The number of patients who were hospitalized as they suffered moderate to severe strokes was similar to the number of patients who were hospitalized on weekdays. However, the number of patients who suffered from mild strokes was lower. This suggested that these patients delayed their visit to a hospital.

According to Dr. Kapral, the change in the mortality rate indicated “an accumulation of small deficiencies in care” – this includes secondary treatments which may appear insignificant but play an important role in recovery of the patient.

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